INSPIRING AFRICAN TABLE SETTING IDEAS

INSPIRING AFRICAN TABLE SETTING IDEAS

‘Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation’.

Oscar Wilde

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Finding reasons to host dinner parties, lunches etc in the comforts of your home should not be difficult.

Coming up with obscure reasons to host my guests gives me the inspiration to display my heritage. The conversation always gears towards knowing the history of my country (Ghana) and food.

With years of experience organising such private events, I have compiled a few videos covering table setting, how to set an African inspired table and how to include your heritage and personalise your table setting for the festive season.

After watching the videos were you inspired?

Tell me a bit about your culture and what pieces you will incorporate into your table setting.

Please your comments below with your answers and thoughts.

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HOMEMADE COUSCOUS & JOLLOF

HOMEMADE COUSCOUS & JOLLOF

The time on the clock said 05:30hrs as I sipped my black coffee and started researching about Millet Couscous. The constant request for Brukina (a Ghanaian drink made from Millet and Milk) by my subscribers inspired my early rise.

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The outcome of my research meant one had to use CousCous Millet and  not the Millet in its natural form. I could place an order for the Millet Couscous however that will delay my filming for another week.

I had all the ingredients needed to make my own Millet Couscous apart from the Muslin cloth needed for steaming.

During my childhood Mum made a dish known as ‘Korklui’ where the fermented Corn dough was turned into granules using a flat wooden sieve known as ‘Agbadze’ and boiled into a porridge.

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I knew  Agbadze (as known in the Ewe language) was  used in Ghana and Togo, however I was curious to know if any other country also used it and it’s local name. My question read…

‘Good morning folks. What would you call this in your local language and in English? 😜 Do you use this in your country? Tell me more.

*Responses*

Elibri

*I guess it can be called Sranui*. ‘Ewe language from the Ho area of Ghana’ as explained by Amadebrah

Qwesi_gentry

*We call it Agbaedzea in Angola and we use it for sieving’

Freda Muyambo (CEO of Tarts & Crumble based in Nigeria).

**Used for winnowing? I guess it is called a winnower or winnow’**

Lyon

**Used by the Ga people for the preparation of Kpokpoi**

Chayilediyie

*It’s called Ukeng in my dialect (Akwa Ibom State in Nigeria)**

Thank you folks for your contribution to my research. In the name of sticking to the recipe for the Millet Couscous  find the list of ingredients below;

680g of Millet flour

227g of Rice flour

200ml of cold water

 

Jollof

250g of Jollof stew

340g of Millet Couscous

METHOD

Watch how to make your own Gluten free Couscous below;

Don’t forget to subscribe, try the recipe, leave comments with your feedback and share 😘